DIY Carbon Tax – A Personal Clean Energy Investment

David Lawrence has brought his extensive experience in the energy industry to a number of roles, including several leadership positions at Shell. Holding a PhD in geology and geophysics from Yale University, David Lawrence has worked around the world on everything from deep water exploration and production, to shale gas to uranium prospecting to wind energy to producer finance. He recently served as Executive Vice President Global Exploration for Royal Dutch Shell and Executive Vice President Exploration and Commercial at Shell Upstream Americas and currently lends his experience and perspective to his climate- and energy-focused blog via The Energy Collective http://theenergycollective.com

Recently, Mr. Lawrence proposed a simple, personal Do It Yourself Carbon Tax, imposed the tax on himself, and challenged others to fo the same. With the aim of improving his energy efficiency, increasing his clean energy investments, and combating energy poverty, he set out with a three-part plan to reduce his carbon footprint. In 2015, he will work to reduce his CO2 emissions by 10 percent, and will continue to strive for a 50 percent reduction over the next ten years. Additionally, he will comply with a self-imposed carbon tax, directing these funds into an investment account targeting clean energy developments. The plan also includes regular contributions to organizations dedicated to curbing energy poverty worldwide. Lawrence’s DIY Carbon Tax enables participants to reduce their energy use, save money, invest for the future and create real value and help those living in energy poverty.

Encouraging readers of his Energy Collective blog to join him in this endeavor, Mr. Lawrence outlined the steps individuals can take to apply a carbon tax to their own lives. Those interested in reducing carbon footprints should first determine their annual CO2 output using one of many free online calculators. Afterwards, they should establish both their carbon reduction goals and personal CO2 tax rate before determining which clean energy companies, research institutions, products, and services they will invest.

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